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Low Cost Housing In Indonesia

Clothing, food and shelter are the basic needs of every individual. But the construction of housing that is not in favor of the community makes the hope of having an affordable and adequate house in the center of the city.

Houses have become commodities with increasingly expensive prices, not as basic human rights needs. In Jakarta, housing prices rise by around 18 percent per year, while the average working class income rises 10-12 percent per year. The house must be returned as a place of human dignity, civilized and living in one community.

Affordable Housing For The People

It is the duty of the government to provide affordable and adequate housing for the people. The state must change relations with the financial sector (sources of funding and cross subsidies), fully control the developer (supervision of spatial planning and selective licensing), and urge the property market to provide cheap housing.

Affordable housing is what the people are looking for, especially low-income people and modest young families. The location of housing must also be affordable. Thomas Meyer and Faisal Basri, as responders in the discussion, pushed the location of housing to be directed to the city center.

The growth of new housing that is getting further away from the city center actually harms low-income people. The price of the house offered looks cheap, but it is not balanced with information that there are additional costs that must be incurred by prospective residents, such as transportation costs (fuel and vehicle service), travel time (poor public transportation and use of private vehicles), and health costs that must be get paid later.

Housing is supported by adequate facilities and infrastructure. The limited land area of ​​the city encourages the provision of vertical housing. Integrated area (can be in the form of a flat) supported by school facilities, markets, offices, parks / gardens, as well as evacuation routes and disasters.

Intolerant actions thrive in this country because there are laws or policies that conflict with one another. The Constitution clearly guarantees the right to freedom of religion and belief. But on the other hand there are still rules and policies that can threaten freedom of religion and belief which are maintained, including the Joint Decree of 3 Ministers of 2008 concerning Ahmadiyah and Joint Regulation of 2 Ministers of 2006 concerning Houses of Worship. There are also many regional regulations that limit freedom of religion and belief.

Intolerant action also continues to repeat because the government does not act decisively every time there is a violation of freedom of religion and belief that occurred before. The government has a series of poor report cards in dealing with conflicts due to differences in religion and beliefs and oppression of minority groups. Freezing of the Yasmin Church permit in Bogor, West Java; the burning of churches in Klaten and Tegal, Central Java; discrimination against Ahmadiyah followers; and the decline of the Amithaba Buddha statue at Tri Ratna Vihara in Tanjung Balai, North Sumatra, is a small part of the blurred portrait of the disregard for human rights.

If the government continues to ignore actions that do not respect such diversity, similar cases will continue to interfere with freedom of worship in this country.

In other countries like Canada, affordable housing is available to all and the choice to renovate their homes using quality materials such as those offered by a known Roofing company in Toronto. If this is possible in other parts of the world, this is not a far cry for Indonesia.