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How the Pandemic changed Gaming Behaviors

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Who will pay more in the pandemic and feel less lonely?

Researchers, Steve and Manuel, reach the end of this question in their research. We talked to and asked both of them: Who are these results related to? Global pandemics and bans are increasing the number and duration of players.

 

Two researchers want to know: What is the relationship between motivation and perceived loneliness?

The Covid19 pandemic has upset our daily lives, expelling us to four walls, and the gaming industry is benefiting from it. The number of players, playtime, game gambling (eg. sell CSGO skins for real money, etc.), and spending time on video games is increasing rapidly.

Of course, the focus is also on the relationship between social distance and social video games. Two researcher doctors, Steve Nebel and Mag from TU Chemnitz. Manuel Ninaus of Dr. Insbruck University is interested in this topic and in her research examined the relationship between games and gamer loneliness.

 

And you’re not alone:

​​In 2020, some research and research was done on the topic of games during Covid19. Some people favor video games in lockdown, while others warn about morbid gambling addiction. We talked to Steve and Manuel about the results that are currently being published. What did the two researchers learn from their research? And why are such, but very obvious results so important to the study?

Who plays does not feel lonely?

Steve Nebel (University of Chemnitz) and Manuel Ninaus (University of Innsbruck) both work in the field of educational games, dealing with the wise use of video games as a learning method. Their work contrasts with the famous “killer game debate,” in which video games are often portrayed as the source of all evil. That was the motivation for her research. “Does gambling really connect us?”: “We used pandemics and social distance measurements to investigate whether players play video games for social reasons.” Manuel explains.

 

“Convenient Samples”

So you enthusiastically participated and created a survey that asked more than 700 German-speaking players about their playing time, motives, and perceived loneliness. In the empirical study, we will talk about so-called “convenient samples”, that is, arbitrary samples. As Steve explains to us in an interview, this does not allow us to draw conclusions about the total population. The results apply only to the study group that fully meets the goals of the two researchers.